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Article
New Era of Lavish Land Grants: Taking Public Property for Private Use and Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States
UF Law Faculty Publications
  • Danaya C. Wright, University of Florida Levin College of Law
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Abstract
J.R. Pole's new book, Contract and Consent: Representation and the Jury in Anglo-American Legal History, is a delightful romp through centuries of Anglo-American history, law, and political theory. It would be better titled Contract, Consent, Juries, Sovereignty, and the State: A History of the Anglicization of Western Political Ideas. But in any event, this delightful set of essays, some more closely linked together than others, spans a breathtaking set of ideas--from sovereignty to the social compact to slavery to the moral agency of juries--through a breathtaking set of sources--from Slade's Case to Shakespeare to Aquinas to Faust to the Federalists--with an eye toward illustrating how somewhat mundane legal principles, developed in the crucible of common law reason, form the basis for numerous grand political ideas and fundamental social policies.
Citation Information
Danaya C. Wright, New Era of Lavish Land Grants: Taking Public Property for Private Use and Brandt Revocable Trust v. United States, 28-OCT Prob. & Prop. 30 (2014), available at http://scholarship.law.ufl.edu/facultypub/606