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Contribution to Book
The Public Sphere as Site of Emancipation and Enlightenment: A Discourse Theoretic Critique of Digital Communication
Re-Imagining Public Space: The Frankfurt School in the Twenty-First Century
  • David Ingram, Loyola University Chicago
  • Asaf Bar-Tura
Document Type
Book Chapter
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Pages
65-86
Publisher Name
Palgrave MacMillan
Publisher Location
New York, NY
Abstract
Habermas claims that an inclusive public sphere is the only deliberative forum for generating public opinion that satisfies the epistemic and normative conditions underlying legitimate decision-making. He adds that digital technologies and other mass media need not undermine – but can extend – rational deliberation when properly instituted. This paper draws from social epistemology and technology studies to demonstrate the epistemic and normative limitations of this extension. We argue that current online communication structures fall short of satisfying the required epistemic and normative conditions. Furthermore, the extent to which Internet-based communications contribute to legitimate democratic opinion and will formation depends on the design of the technologies in question.
Identifier
978-1-137-37331-1
Comments

Author Posting. © 2014 Boros and Glass. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Palgrave Macmillan for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Re-Imagining Public Space: The Frankfurt School in the 21st Century (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137383433

Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0
Citation Information
“The Public Sphere as Site of Emancipation and Enlightenment: A Discourse Theoretic Critique of Digital Communication” (co-author Asaf Bar-Tura), from D. Boros and Jim Glass (eds), Re-Imagining Public Space: The Frankfurt School in the 21st Century (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).